Having a Whale of a Time

October 25, 2015

Class photo with the "orca" safely on a mat supported by ponttons

Class photo with the “orca” safely on a mat supported by ponttons


The correct way to wrap  stranded marine mammals.

The correct way to wrap stranded marine mammals.

A very successful workshop weekend was held by Project Jonah in the Browns Bay Coast Guard rooms and on Browns Bay Beach, on 17 and 18 October.

Both fully booked day courses focused on beached whale rescue practices.

Some of the students had came from as far away as Wellington and others from overseas.

Professionals from DOC and Project Jonah ran the lectures. Presentations covered the theory in the morning then we put it all into practice in the afternoon.

Wetsuit on – and red cap – it was all hands on both on land and sea.

The size and weight of the dolphin and orca models used gave us an idea of what reality would be like if a call out came to rescue beached whales. At least we’d know what to do and why!

My hands were so cold and blue when I left late in the afternoon, I called at the local fish and chip shop to solve my problem!

The warmth of the food through the newspaper wrapping did the trick! The circulation in my hands was restored before I hit the road.

Copyright note: large photos courtesy of Project Jonah 2015; small photos, Ann Russell 2015.

The demo for using pontoons in the sea started with the placement of parts on the sand.

The demo for using pontoons in the sea started with the placement of parts on the sand.

Rolling the safety mat in preparation for work with pontoons.

Rolling the safety mat in preparation for work with pontoons.

Team positioning the pontoon along the side of the whale.

Team positioning the pontoon along the side of the whale.[caption id="attachment_970" align="alignright" width="960"]
[caption id="attachment_1001" align="alignright" width="1024"]The Project Jonah at work on Browns Bay Beach. The Project Jonah at work on Browns Bay Beach.